Is the Redundancy “Genuine”?

Due to the unprecedented disruption caused by COVID-19, many employees’ positions have been made redundant throughout Australia. However, employers should note that if the redundancy is not “genuine”, the employer can be liable for unfair dismissal of employees.

According to section 389 of the Fair Work Act 2009 (the “Act”), to be a genuine redundancy all of the following requirements must be satisfied:

a. The employer no longer requires the employee’s job to be performed by anyone because of changes in the operational requirements of the employer’s enterprise.

The employer must consider whether the job is no longer required and will not be performed by anyone else.… Read More

Are your contractor payments subject to payroll tax?

Your payments to contractors may be subject to payroll tax if the worker is considered as an employee. The NSW Revenue considers a wide range of factors to determine whether a worker is an employee or contractor for payroll tax purposes. Even if a worker is identified as a contractor rather than an employee, your payments to the contractor may still be taxable for payroll tax purposes if a ‘relevant contract’ exists.

According to the Payroll Tax Act 2007 (“Act”), a ‘relevant contract’ is any kind of arrangement where you:
– supply services;
– are supplied with services; or
– give out goods for re-supply after work has been performed in relation to goods.… Read More

Special tax considerations needed if any of your beneficiaries are non-Australian residents

When making a Will you need to be aware of special rules that apply to gifts to non-resident beneficiaries. These rules can even apply to gifts to Australian citizens who have lived overseas for a long period.
The general rule is that the beneficiary is taken to have acquired the assets on the day the testator died, and any capital gain or loss relating to a Capital Gain Tax (CGT) asset owned by the deceased is disregarded. That means-
• no CGT is payable from the estate
• no CGT is potentially payable by the beneficiary until he or she actually sells it; and
• the beneficiary will usually have access to a range of CGT concessions when he or she actually sells.… Read More

Employ Skilled Migrants in Regional Areas

If your business need skilled workers that are in short supply, a good option for your business is to employ skilled migrants who are already in Australia on a skilled visa such as subclasses 189, 190 or 489/491. Many skilled migrants have high-level qualifications and years of work experience. You may find them valuable to the operation and development of your business.
In regional areas, the most common skilled visa held by migrants is 489 visa (to be replaced by 491 visa as from 16 November 2019). The 489 visa is also called Skilled Regional (Provisional) visa. Typically, under the invited pathway of 489 visa a skilled worker is nominated by an Australian state/territory or sponsored by an eligible relative and is then invited to apply for the visa.… Read More

What if a foreign person wants to buy your agricultural land?

Before answering this question, we should first understand what agricultural land is. Under the foreign investment framework, agricultural land means land in Australia that is used, or could reasonably be used, for a primary production business. The meaning and scope of a primary production business can be found in the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. It includes, for example, cultivating or propagating plants, fungi or their products or parts, maintaining animals for the purpose of selling them or their bodily produce, or manufacturing dairy produce from raw material that you produced.
If your land falls into the category of agricultural land, then the foreign buyer must get approval for the proposed acquisition from the Treasurer if the threshold of $15 million is exceeded.… Read More