Section 38A of the Workers Compensation Act 1987 – a bonus for workers with Highest Needs

Under the NSW Workers Compensation system a worker is assessed, once they have reached maximum medical improvement, based on a percentage of whole person impairment. This percentage then equates to varying levels of compensation. If a worker is assessed at greater than 30% whole person impairment the worker is then considered a worker with Highest Needs.

Section 38A of the Workers Compensation Act 1987 then comes into play as it provides a special provision for workers with Highest Needs. Provided the worker has some level of incapacity, the worker has access to a minimum weekly payment of compensation. Under section 38A the amount is $788.32 indexed, and is currently $840 per week.… Read More

Defensive Debtor Control – Clint Coles

Undertaking work before being paid is a part of business.  If you’ve been in business for a while you’ll know the difficulties that can arise in getting paid after the fact.

This is a situation where prevention is much better than cure.  There are a number of steps that a business can take to greatly reduce the likelihood of payment problems arising.

Although it seems simple, the first is often overlooked.  It is important to properly identify who your business is dealing with and to make an assessment of the creditworthiness of the entity you are contracting with.  People and companies can enter into contracts, but nobody else. … Read More

We are still learning – Ken Sorrenson

The saying “the only constant is change” certainly applies to the law and legal practice generally. Laws and client needs are constantly changing.

To be an expert and effective solicitor, a lifetime of continuing legal education is required.  In that context Everingham Solomons is very pleased to announce that Clint Coles has been awarded a Master of Laws degree by Sydney University.

The Master of Laws course conducted by Sydney University is without doubt one of the most rigorous and prestigious in Australia.  Clint’s studies centered particularly upon commercial law subjects such as –

  • advanced rules for the drafting and interpretation of commercial contracts, the ability for terms to be implied into contract and the availability of juristic remedies in the case of ambiguity;
  • personal and corporate insolvency including the roles of directors, proprietors, creditors and secured parties in insolvency;
  • Australian business taxes particularly the major transaction taxes of capital gains tax, stamp duty, GST and the various carve outs and concessions;
  • advanced study of the establishment and use of the commercial trust as a vehicle for business and investment, the regulation of managed investment schemes and the potential liability of trustees and beneficiaries,
  • the rationale behind and implementation of the recently developed Personal Property Securities regime in Australia, its impact on borrowers and secured parties and its role in the leasing environment; and
  • structuring strategies for asset protection in the estate and business planning context.
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Irrigation Users – No Meter, No Pump – Alex Long

Changes to the law in NSW has implemented a no meter, no pump policy under the Water Reform Action Plan.  Greater penalties now exist for Water Licence holders who do not comply with the obligation to install a properly working meter.

Under the plan, it will be an offence for Water Licence holders to:

  • Fail to comply with the conditions of a Water Licence or works approval which requires the installation of a meter;
  • Fail to install metering equipment when required;
  • Take water from a metered water supply work if the meter is not working properly;
  • Interfere with, damage, destroy or disconnect any metering equipment; or
  • Fail to keep the required metering records.
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Don’t be late! The consequences of not completing a Property Contract on time. – Katie Cook

In every Contract there is a set time for Completion, or ‘Settlement’ as it is often called. The time for Completion can be a set number of days or weeks after exchange takes place (eg 42 days or 6 weeks), or a set time after another event takes place (eg 14 days after a plan or subdivision has been registered).

Completion or Settlement is essentially when the Purchaser hands over their money and takes title to the property.

It is crucial that a purchaser in a property transaction is aware of the date that Completion is due under the Contract, as there are serious consequences when Completion doesn’t take place on time.… Read More

Water Crisis NSW – how temporary restrictions affect your WAL or Approval. – Alex Long

Despite the recent rainfall received in the area, there has not been any significant inflows into the state’s water storages.  On 31 March 2019, the Minister for Regional Water made an order for temporary water restrictions under Section 324 of the Water Management Act 2000 (the Act).

Under Section 324, the Minister has the authority to order temporary water restrictions within a water source for a specified period if those restrictions are determined to be in the public interest. Under Section 324(1), public interest includes “to cope with a water shortage, threat to public health or safety or to manage water for environmental purposes”.… Read More

What is probate and when do I need it? – Suzanne Hindmarsh

A Grant of Probate is a document issued by the Supreme Court that acknowledges the validity of the deceased’s Will and authorises the Executor/s to administer the Estate.

Whether or not Probate is required depends on the nature and value of the deceased’s assets.

If the deceased held land in their sole name or as tenants in common with another, Probate will be required.

Financial institutions, superannuation funds, aged care facilities and share registries may also require Probate for larger investments before they will allow those assets to be dealt with. Generally, such institutions will require Probate if the amount held with them is greater than $50,000.00.… Read More

Giving The Gift Of Life – Lesley McDonnell

I am often asked by clients who want to donate their organs, if they should include this wish in their Will. Due to the fact that a Will is not read until after a person’s death, there are better options for people to record their wishes to donate their organs.

Firstly, the Australian Organ Donor Register is Australia’s only national register that enables people to record their decision about becoming an organ donor after their death. Registration is easy, voluntary and allows a person to choose which organs and tissues they are willing to donate. There are a number of ways to register including, but not limited to, the following:

Register through your existing online myGov account;

Register using an Online form through https://donatelife.gov.au website;

Download a registration form from the Department of Human Services website at www.humanservices.gov.au; or

Visit a local Department of Human Services Centre and pick up a Donor Register brochure and registration form.… Read More

You’ve Decided To Sell Your Home – What Now? – Terry Robinson

Before you can advertise a residential property for sale you are required by law to have a copy of the Contract available for prospective Purchasers to inspect. This is required whether you propose to sell through a Real Estate Agent or privately.

To enable a Contract to be prepared you should contact your Solicitor or Conveyancer as soon as possible to avoid delays in getting the Contract prepared.

Legislation sets out various documents and certificates that are required to be attached to the Contract, failure to attach these could potentially give the Purchaser a right to get out of the Contract after Contracts have exchanged.… Read More

Is A Sperm Donor A Parent? – Sophie Newham

Many individuals now plan to have children on their own without a partner.

This means that the traditional make up of a family is no longer clear cut and the law has to keep up with significant social and cultural changes in society making the definition of parents and families so much more complex.

Many parents who use formal or informal sperm donors or conceive a child outside of a married or de-facto relationship, want to know whether sperm donors have any parental rights once their child is born.

There are a number of relevant laws in place in New South Wales, but in summary a sperm donor is presumed to not be a parent of a child unless married or in a de-facto relationship with the mother at the time of conception.… Read More