Special tax considerations needed if any of your beneficiaries are non-Australian residents

When making a Will you need to be aware of special rules that apply to gifts to non-resident beneficiaries. These rules can even apply to gifts to Australian citizens who have lived overseas for a long period.
The general rule is that the beneficiary is taken to have acquired the assets on the day the testator died, and any capital gain or loss relating to a Capital Gain Tax (CGT) asset owned by the deceased is disregarded. That means-
• no CGT is payable from the estate
• no CGT is potentially payable by the beneficiary until he or she actually sells it; and
• the beneficiary will usually have access to a range of CGT concessions when he or she actually sells.… Read More

Ending a Residential Tenancy – from the Landlord’s perspective.

There are strict rules that apply when a Landlord wants to bring a residential tenancy to an end.

A termination notice must be provided to the tenant. This notice must be in writing, addressed to the tenant, signed and dated by you or your managing agent, provide the date the tenancy is to be terminated and the tenant needs to vacate and in some circumstances provide the reason for the notice.

In some circumstances there is no minimum notice period for the tenant – for example if the tenant dies, the property becomes uninhabitable or is destroyed, is being compulsorily acquired (for example by Council) or is not legally usable as a residence.… Read More

Are you in Year 12 at Tamworth, Quirindi, Gunnedah or Manilla? Are you wanting to study Law next year at University? Great news – the applications are now open for the Sir Adrian Solomons Memorial Law Bursary

Everingham Solomons are pleased to announce that once again a Tamworth, Quirindi, Gunnedah or Manilla Year 12 student wishing to undertake university study in Law will have a valuable opportunity to receive the benefits of our Law Bursary.

The Sir Adrian Solomons Memorial Law Bursary has long provided financial assistance for the successful applicant during their first year of university as well as an opportunity to gain valuable paid work experience in our offices periodically throughout the duration of their studies.

Everingham Solomons will also be making a cash donation to the school of the successful applicant to assist in maintaining the excellent educational standards that our region can offer.… Read More

Employ Skilled Migrants in Regional Areas

If your business need skilled workers that are in short supply, a good option for your business is to employ skilled migrants who are already in Australia on a skilled visa such as subclasses 189, 190 or 489/491. Many skilled migrants have high-level qualifications and years of work experience. You may find them valuable to the operation and development of your business.
In regional areas, the most common skilled visa held by migrants is 489 visa (to be replaced by 491 visa as from 16 November 2019). The 489 visa is also called Skilled Regional (Provisional) visa. Typically, under the invited pathway of 489 visa a skilled worker is nominated by an Australian state/territory or sponsored by an eligible relative and is then invited to apply for the visa.… Read More

You attended an auction – or did you?

As many of you would know, there is a 5 business day cooling off period which applies to the sale and purchase of residential real estate.
The intent of the legislation which created the cooling off period was to encourage potential purchasers to exchange quickly to avoid being gazumped whilst retaining the ability to pull out of the sale at minimal cost if anything untoward was discovered.
There are a number of situations in which the cooling off period does not apply. One of those situations is where the property is sold at auction or is sold on the same day after a failed auction.… Read More

When does bank finance “approval” mean approved?

You’ve been saving hard and have the deposit to purchase your first home. You’ve looked at many houses and finally found the one. You’ve made an offer through the real estate agent and your offer has been accepted by the vendor.

You organise your pest and building reports. You know your finance is arranged as you’ve been pre-approved by your chosen lender. WRONG!

A pre-approval of finance from a lender is only an “indication” of the amount the lender considers you may borrow based on your previous financial circumstances. Until you receive written confirmation of finance approval from your lender noting the details of the house you intend to purchase and sign a loan contract, the lender is under no obligation to provide you with finance.… Read More

Do Restrictive Covenants on Land Restrict Development?

Quite often, land developers place restrictive covenants on land. For example the restrictive covenant be that: the land shall only be used for residential purposes, the buildings must be of a certain size or of a certain material or type of construction or design.
Are these restrictive covenants enforceable? The answer is sometimes yes and sometimes no.
Let’s take another example. If you purchase land in a subdivision which contains a restrictive covenant that permits the erection of a single residential building only, can you legally erect a multiple occupancy dwelling such as a duplex or triplex?
Despite what most people think, if the Local Government zoning laws permit multiple occupancies and a Development Consent to build multiple occupancies is granted by the Local Council, then the Council’s Development Consent overrides the restrictive covenant on the land.… Read More

What if a foreign person wants to buy your agricultural land?

Before answering this question, we should first understand what agricultural land is. Under the foreign investment framework, agricultural land means land in Australia that is used, or could reasonably be used, for a primary production business. The meaning and scope of a primary production business can be found in the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. It includes, for example, cultivating or propagating plants, fungi or their products or parts, maintaining animals for the purpose of selling them or their bodily produce, or manufacturing dairy produce from raw material that you produced.
If your land falls into the category of agricultural land, then the foreign buyer must get approval for the proposed acquisition from the Treasurer if the threshold of $15 million is exceeded.… Read More

Sarah’s Rule – A recent change to the NSW road rules

As of the 26th of September 2019, NSW has had a change to one of its road rules. From this date Motorists will be required to slow down when passing stationary Emergency or breakdown / tow vehicles which are displaying flashing lights.
A trial version of this rule change has been in effect for the past 12 months, however amendments to this have been made due to public feedback.
So what does this actually mean for Motorists?
Motorist will now be required to slow down when passing stationary vehicles which are displaying red and blue or yellow flashing lights. These vehicles include Ambulances, Police vehicles, Fire and Rescue vehicles, State Emergency Service vehicles, Volunteer Rescue Organisation’s vehicles, Traffic Commander vehicles, Transport Emergency vehicles, Tow Trucks and Breakdown Assistance vehicles.… Read More

Ending a Residential Tenancy – from the Tenants perspective

To bring a tenancy to an end you must provide written notice to the landlord or managing agent, in a specific timeframe depending on your situation.
When your fixed term is ending – if you want to leave at the end of your fixed term lease you need to give the landlord at least 14 days’ notice. You can provide this notice at any time up to the very last day of your fixed term.
If your fixed term has already ended – if you have continued to rent the premises, say on a week to week or month to month basis, you need to give the landlord at least 21 days’ notice.… Read More