Load ‘er up, but tie ‘er down

Winter is in the rear-view mirror, the scent of Spring is in the air and Summer is approaching fast. It’s the perfect time to do the odd jobs around the house and tend to those overgrown yards. However, in order for your yard to look schmick you might be required to load up the trailer and head to the tip.

This is a timely reminder for all, that penalties for uncovered, unstable and overhanging loads can be quite harsh.

Fines for these offences will see you obtain 3 demerit points and cop a fine of $457.00 per offence.

That’s quite an expensive rubbish run!… Read More

Residential Tenancies Act – Water Efficiency Measures (Part 7)

 

There have been amendments as to what water efficiency measures a landlord needs to undertake under Residential Tenancies Act 2010 and new Residential Tenancies Regulation 2019 which commenced on 23 March 2020

Before a landlord is able to pass on water usage charges to the tenant, the residential property must be separately metered, meet the water efficiency measures prescribed by the Residential Tenancies Act, and the charges must not exceed the amount payable by the landlord (according to the water supplier’s bill or other evidence).

The changes provide additional water efficiency measures, including all taps and toilets on the property need to be checked at the start of a tenancy so any leaks are fixed.… Read More

More Help for Small Business

COVID-19 is continuing to have an enormous social and business cost in Australia and governments both State and Federal have been doing their best to provide assistance.

Currently many small businesses are relying upon government wage subsidies for ongoing viability. A leading economics research firm has projected that almost 1/4 of a million small businesses are at risk of failure.

The Federal Government recently announced new insolvency laws aimed at assisting small businesses to regain viability. These laws are modelled on legislation that has been in place in the US for many years commonly known as “Chapter 11”. The objective is to provide a process that potentially allows stressed businesses to take action to restructure before it becomes too late to save the business.… Read More

Are you in Year 12 at Tamworth, Quirindi, Gunnedah or Manilla? Are you wanting to study Law next year at University? Great news – applications are now open for the Sir Adrian Solomons Memorial Law Bursary

Everingham Solomons are pleased to announce that once again a Tamworth, Quirindi, Gunnedah or Manilla Year 12 student wishing to undertake university study in Law will have a valuable opportunity to receive the benefits of our Law Bursary.

The Sir Adrian Solomons Memorial Law Bursary has long provided financial assistance for the successful applicant during their first year of university as well as an opportunity to gain valuable paid work experience in our offices periodically throughout the duration of their studies.

Everingham Solomons will also be making a cash donation to the school of the successful applicant to assist in maintaining the excellent educational standards that our region can offer.… Read More

What’s in a name?

Applying to change your child’s name after separation or divorce.

Under the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth), parents are required to make decisions jointly in regards to all matters concerning their child’s long-term care, welfare and development.

If both parents agree to change their child’s name, the process is simple. In New South Wales, applications to register a change of a child’s name are governed by Section 28 of the Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act 1995.

‘The parents of a child may apply to the Registrar, in a form approved by the Registrar, for registration of a change of the child’s name if –

a) The child’s birth is registered in the State, or
b) The child was born outside Australia, the child’s birth is not registered in Australia and the child has been a resident in the State for at least 3 consecutive years immediately preceding the date of the application.’… Read More

Residential Tenancies Act – Break fees payable by tenant (Part 6)

ReThere are new break fees payable by a tenant who wishes to break a fixed term lease under Residential Tenancies Act 2010 and new Residential Tenancies Regulation 2019 which commenced on 23 March 2020

Mandatory break fees apply to all fixed-term agreements of 3 years or less, when a tenant ends the agreement early. This applies to agreements that are entered into from 23 March 2020.

The break fees are:

• 4 weeks rent if less than 25 per cent of the agreement has expired
• 3 weeks rent if 25 per cent or more but less than 50 per cent of the agreement has expired
• 2 weeks rent if 50 per cent or more but less than 75 per cent of the agreement has expired
• 1 weeks rent if 75 per cent or more of the agreement has expired

For example:

• If 7 months of a 12 month tenancy agreement (or 58 per cent) has expired, a tenant would need to pay a fee equal to 2 weeks rent to the landlord to end the agreement early
• If 2 months of a 6 month tenancy agreement (or 33 per cent) has expired, the tenant would need to pay a fee equal to 3 weeks rent to the landlord to end their agreement early

If you need assistance with any property or land matters contact Everingham Solomons because Helping You is Our Business.Read More

Residential Tenancies Act – Tenants damage and modifications (Part 5)

There have been amendments as to what constitutes damage and the rules regarding removing modifications under Residential Tenancies Act 2010 and new Residential Tenancies Regulation 2019 which commenced on 23 March 2020

Tenants are responsible for any damage they cause to the property.

At the end of the tenancy, a tenant is responsible for leaving the property in the same condition as at the start of the tenancy, except fair, wear and tear. This includes making sure any alterations, additions or renovations are removed and also fixing any damage caused to the property. A tenant can choose whether to remove any ‘fixtures’ they have installed, provided they repair or compensate the landlord for any damage caused by removing the fixture.… Read More

In the Zone? Extra points for you!

Did you know that for certain traffic and parking offences committed within a school zone you can incur an additional demerit point?

So not only will you incur the demerit points for whatever offence you committed, you may get an additional point for committing the offence in a School Zone. If that’s not enough, the fines that you will face are substantially higher for offences committed in a School Zone.

Take for example a Class A vehicle caught speeding, less than 10/km over the speed limit. This offence would usually get you a $121.00 fine and one demerit point. This offence committed in a School Zone would be a $200.00 fine and two demerit points.… Read More

Residential Tenancies Act – Can a tenant alter the premises? (Part 4)

There have been amendments as to what constitutes alterations of a ‘minor nature’ under Residential Tenancies Act 2010 and new Residential Tenancies Regulation 2019 which commenced on 23 March 2020.

The new Regulation lists the kind of fixtures, alterations, additions or renovations that are ‘minor’. Some examples are:

• securing furniture to a non-tiled wall for safety reasons
• fitting a childproof latch to an outdoor gate of a single dwelling, installing child safety gates inside the property or window safety devices
• installing/replacing an internal window covering e.g. curtains, removable blinds, installing cleats/cord guides to secure blind/curtain cords
• installing a wireless removable outdoor security camera
• applying shatter-resistant film to window/glass doors
• planting vegetables, flowers, herbs or shrubs (shrubs that don’t grow more than 2 metres) in the garden if existing vegetation/plants do not need to be removed
• installing hand-held shower heads/lever-style taps to assist elderly or disabled occupants.… Read More

70’s Rock & Traffic Law

“Life in the fast lane” is the title of one of the Eagles’ biggest hits from the 1970s. Unfortunately however, it is also a turn of phrase that can be used to describe the driving habits of many drivers.
If you have, to quote Meatloaf, been driving “like a bat out of hell” and had your licence suspended, in certain circumstances you are able to appeal a licence suspension made by either Transport for NSW (TfNSW) or the Police. Examples of appellable decisions include:

– TfNSW licence suspensions for exceeding the speed limit by more than 30          but less than 45 kilometres per hour;
– Police on the spot licence suspensions for exceeding the speed limit by more than 45 kilometres per hour; and
– TfNSW decisions to suspend P1 or P2 provisional drivers licence for loss of demerit points.… Read More